Do you know a simple eye test can now detect glaucoma?

Young woman in glasses covering face eyes with both hands

Researchers have developed a simple eye test that could help solve the biggest global cause of irreversible blindness– glaucoma, by detecting the onset of the disease at a very early stage. Loss of sight in patients with glaucoma is caused by the death of cells in the retina at the back of the eye. This cell death is called apoptosis.

The new technique called DARC, stands for detection of apoptosing retinal cells.

It uses a specially developed fluorescent marker which attaches to cell proteins when injected into patients. Sick cells appear as white fluorescent spots during eye examination.

Glaucoma affects an estimated 60 million people in the world, with one in 10 suffering total sight loss in both the eyes.

Initial clinical trials were carried out on a small number of glaucoma patients and compared with tests on healthy people. The initial clinical trials established the safety of the test for patients, according to a study published in the journal BRAIN.

The researchers believe the test has potential for early diagnosis of other degenerative neurological conditions, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis.

Also share your innovative research works by submitting abstracts @ https://bit.ly/2HZqIrf

 

 

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How to stop Eye Twitching

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An eyelid twitch, or myokymia, is a repetitive, involuntary spasm of the eyelid muscles. A twitch usually occurs in the upper lid, but it can occur in both the upper and lower lids. For most people, these spasms are very mild and feel like a gentle tug on the eyelid. Eyelid twitches may be caused or made worse by:

  • eye irritation
  • eyelid strain
  • fatigue
  • lack of sleep
  • medication side effects
  • stress
  • use of alcohol, tobacco, or caffeine

If the spasms become chronic, you may have what’s known as “benign essential blepharospasm,” which is the name for chronic and uncontrollable winking or blinking.

Most eyelid spasms go away without treatment in a few days or weeks. If they don’t go away, you can try to eliminate or decrease potential causes. The most common causes of eyelid twitch are stress, fatigue, and caffeine. To ease eye twitching, you might want to try the following:

  • Drink less caffeine.
  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Keep your eye surfaces lubricated with over-the-counter artificial tears or eye drops.
  • Apply a warm compress to your eyes when a spasm begins.

If your eyelid spasms are happening more frequently, keep a journal and note when they occur. Note your intake of caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol, as well as your level of stress and how much sleep you’ve been getting in the periods leading up to and during the eyelid twitching.

If you notice that you have more spasms when you aren’t getting enough sleep, try to go to bed 30 minutes to an hour earlier to help ease the strain on your eyelids and reduce your spasms.

Share your research works @ https://bit.ly/2rvQsRS

Submit your Abstracts for Ophthalmology 2018

Pulsus Group Cordially invites Speakers from all over the world to present at “Global Experts Meeting on Ophthalmology and Ophthalmologist” held at Toronto, Canada on October 24-25, 2018.

The theme of the conference is ‘’Have an Insight Vision with Experts”.

You are invited to attend and participate in this Global event which offers numerous opportunities to share your ideas, applications experiences and to establish business or research relations for future collaboration.

Submit abstracts @ https://bit.ly/2HZqIrf

To know more: https://bit.ly/2rvQsRS

- Ophthalmology 2018 -